Archive | May, 2013

A winter that just won’t give up.

1 May

Part of my massive Gurney’s purchase included an order of Red Zeppelin onions.  And yes, if you’re wondering, Led Zeppelin weighed heavily on my decision to select this specific species of onion.  Yesterday was a decent Minnesota Spring day, so I forged ahead and decided to plant these bad boys in Raised Garden Bed #1 (#2 still needs to be completed, but that’s for another post). Now, mind you, I planted outside…in a t-shirt.  Comfortably.

And, the thing is, I knew there was a snowstorm approaching.  I know…WTH, right?  My thoughts exactly.  It’s May now.  MAY!  So, the weather forecast was calling for much lower temperatures and measurable amounts of snow, but the Red Zeppelins were sure to die if their roots didn’t contact soil sometime soon.  That being said, I made my decision to give these blessed onions a fighting chance.  I planted them.  On April 30.  One day before a snowstorm predictably hit.

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Red Zeppelins in all their glory.  

And then the sun set and rose again.  And this happened:

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Um…yeah.  

If you look closely, to the right of the photo you will see a single row of Red Zeppelins bursting beyond the pesky snow cover.  Two reasons for this: 1) It’s kind of a science experiment.  Will the snow act like enough of an insulator to keep these babies alive? And 2) The blanket wasn’t big enough to cover that last row.

After surveying what may very well be the nail in the coffin for my Zepps, I did what any normal person would do.

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Why, eat and drink of course!

And this wasn’t just any sort of eating.  Oh, no!  I found the lone remaining frozen bag of carrots from last year’s harvest.  After sautéing those babies up in a touch of olive oil, then gently tossing with a bit of brown sugar and balsamic vinegar, they were good to go!

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Seriously, so good.  

Cooking up a bit of tasty goodness using homegrown produce turned out to be just what I needed to restore my zest for backyard gardening.  Even if I’m watching the snowflakes fall in May.

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